Ct law dating restrictions


14-Nov-2019 12:57

Connecticut law does not recognize common-law marriages.

But, a common-law marriage entered into in a state that recognizes such marriages will be recognized in Connecticut if it was valid under the other state According to the National Conference of State Legislatures (NCSL), 10 states (Alabama, Colorado, Iowa, Kansas, Montana, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Texas, and Utah) and the District of Columbia recognize common-law marriages, although some impose certain restrictions.

Only if registered at the county courthouse or by meeting a three-prong test showing evidence of (1) an agreement to be married; (2) cohabitation in Texas; and (3) representation to others that the parties are married.

Unfortunately, there is more that you shouldn’t do than should, but first let’s clarify what is meant by “dating.” Legally, “dating” means one-on-one social contact with another person.

Divorcing clients are often lonely and stressed out, and they may be longing to meet someone new, feel desirable again, and just have fun.

So, many clients decide that just one date can’t hurt.

There is no distinction between platonic contacts and ones that are romantic or sexual, although from a practical standpoint, the romantic/sexual relationships are the ones that draw scrutiny and cause complications.

The reason divorce lawyers counsel against dating while the divorce is pending, even if separated, is that it has the potential to increase both the cost and the stress of the divorce trial. Judges, however, rarely punish someone who begins dating – sexually or otherwise – once they have physically separated from their spouse.

The purpose is to determine exactly when the relationship began, whether it is sexual, whether any marital property has been transferred to the new friend, such as by gift, how much money was spent on dating this person, and whether the spouse has said anything that could be used against him or her at trial.